NJ Tax Appeals: Do It On Your Own — Or Use A Third Party?

From Bankrate.com

Home prices are falling everywhere, but homeowners hoping for lower property taxes may find themselves disappointed when the bill arrives.

If you think your home’s assessed value is too high, you can appeal the tax assessor’s verdict — either on your own or with the help of a third party who will handle the grievance process for you.

These third parties are generally attorneys or independent companies with appraisers on staff. They’ll file the appeal on your behalf, usually on a contingency basis.

More…go to Property Taxes Too High? Get Help.

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