Towns Armed With A “Presumption Of Correctness”

From Greenworks:

 The Golden Key to Winning Your Tax Appeal

The world of municipal real estate tax appeals is unlike any other. Lawyers, politicians, residents and accountants all have a significant say not only in your property taxes, but also in the outcome of your property tax appeal. The deck is stacked against taxpayers before they even show up to their tax appeal.

How could that be?

A little something called the “Presumption of Correctness.”

The Presumption of Correctness is a legal doctrine in New Jersey that assumes the municipality is correct in how it levied its taxes against you. That means the default position where any tax appeal starts at is, you’re wrong. If the town had outdated information, improperly trained evaluators or just negligent or incompetent staff, unless you can prove otherwise, the town is presumed to be correct.

That’s a tough position for any homeowner to be in. You can see the results at the tax appeal hearings. The great mass of taxpayers’ appeals are routinely rejected because the town is presumed to be correct at the outset and the property owners are not properly armed with the data, evidence and facts needed to overcome the Presumption of Correctness. Overcoming the presumption of correctness is the golden key to winning your tax appeal.

But don’t take our word for it. Listen to what Sarah says about her tax appeal coordinated by GreenWorks….

 

Similar Articles

Assessing Your Assessemen... Fair to say,  if you are living in New Jersey, you are probably paying more property taxes than you should. The National Taxpayers Union, in fact, estimates
NJ Tax Appeals: Do It On ... From Bankrate.com Home prices are falling everywhere, but homeowners hoping for lower property taxes may find themselves disappointed when the bill arrives. If you think your home’s
New Jersey Property Tax C...   New Jersey’s highest-in-the-nation property taxes cost 9 percent of household income NJ TODAY Sky-high property taxes continue to be a major problem for New Jersey residents,
Pilot Program AimsTo Cha...   From Lexis Nexis Law Communities: New Jersey Passes Law Affecting the Property Tax Assessment and Appeal Process On February 4, Gov. Chris Christie signed S1213 (the
Princeton U Settles Tax D... Princeton University has agreed to pay $18.2 million over the next several years to settle claims brought by a group of local residents that the university was
New Jersey Tax Appeals Cr... From: Press of Atlantic City The state Department of Community Affairs says tax appeals have gone up by more than 400 percent since 2006. And municipalities, as
Reassessing Property Taxe... The scene is all too familiar: A tax attorney in Weston, Fla., argues that his client’s home value has dropped 8 percent in the past year, making
Tax Appeals In New Provid... From The Independent Press: Among the issues the New Providence Borough Council discussed at its June 25 meeting was a multi-million dollar reassessment of a property in
If They Had Only Checked ... From Star-Ledger: Jerry and Annette Auriemma stand outside their Maplewood home. The couple overpaid three years of property taxes after an appraiser hired by the town wrongly
Lakewood Tax Appeals Coul...     Lakewood budget projects tax hike Asbury Park Press Township Manager Michael Muscillo said the increases are largely caused by $1.7 million set aside for property
Hurricane Sandy Brings A ...     Tax Increases In Shore Towns A Certainty After Superstorm Sandy Patch.com   Toms River-based Horn was originally scheduled to speak along with Berkeley Tax Assessor

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.